A Rare Plant Might Transform How We Find Diamonds

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There are many ways for exploration of the Kimberlite pipes for diamonds, but according to new paper by Mr Stephen E. Haggerty, a rare plant Pendanus candelabrum could serve as a signpost for diamond indicator kimberlite, which might eventually lead to easier and less expensive diamond exploration.

PANDANUS-CANDELABRUM-A-rare-African-plant-that-can-point-diamond-deposits-beneath-the-earth

Pendanus candelabrum 

The author of this paper Mr.Haggerty added that the plant only grew along the kimberlite and not over the adjacent ground. Mr Haggerty believes, this knowledge could make diamond exploration in West Africa a lot cheaper and this could dramatically change the exploration dynamics for diamonds.

Kimberlite is an igneous rock, best known for sometimes containing diamonds. Kimberlite pipes are the most important source of mined diamonds today.

Mr. Haggerty was uncomfortable with some press coverage of his paper, including headlines such as “There’s a Plant That Shows You Where Diamonds Are Buried.” He stresses that, finding a kimberlite pipe does not mean you have found a profitable mine. Only 1 percent of kimberlite pipe discoveries result in economic diamond mines.

Mystery Diamond Color Treatment Stumps GIA

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Mystery-diamond

Even GIA doesn’t have the answer of Mystery Diamond Color. There are around 500 diamonds with uncommon color which is marked as Mystery Diamond by GIA.

The Gemological Institute of America reported that “as many as 500 diamonds may have been subjected to a new mystery color treatment that temporarily improved the stones’ color as much as three grades.”

GIA believes that the treatment temporarily masks diamond’s body color, resulting in a color grade that can be up to three grades higher than it would be normally.

According to spokesperson Stephen Morisseau, GIA first became aware of the tricky treatment after grading some 500 stones submitted by Israeli manufacturers over a series of month.

Mr. Morisseau says that “We reasonably believe these stones were treated in some way” and he also added that “We don’t know what the treatment is, we are actively researching it?”

GIA said in lab alert “We ask anyone who has purchased or holds these diamonds to please resubmit them to any GIA location for review. GIA will expedite the service, and no fee will be assessed.”

L.Y.E Diamonds, E.G.S.D. Diamonds, Romok Abramov, and Yair Matatov these four companies are banned by GIA. After this action by GIA only one company replied which was Romok Abramov? Abramov says ““All the stones mentioned in the GIA report are not mine, I Never saw any of those stones and don’t have any idea if they were treated.”

The World Federation of Diamond Bourses involved and sent statement expressing concern about the incident. The president of WFDB Mr Ernie Blom said that “This is clearly unlawful behavior, we will have no tolerance whatsoever for this type of alleged illegal activity. We are pleased that the GIA publicized this development so that diamantaires can be on their guard.”

Viral Ring….Come with idea to create one of yours

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We are sure you all are aware that last week the “Harry Potter” inspired Golden Snitch Ring went viral and the designer had to stop taking orders, though she has resumed now. The designer of the ring clarifies that it’s not official merchandise, which she did very sweetly, with a small poem on her website. The ring she designed comes in silver and gold with citrine, topaz, sapphire and moissanite stone options. The stones are all honey colored and band is texturized to resemble the Snitch’s famous wings.  Snitch-Ring
 Snitch-Ring-1 Although she didn’t design the ring recently, it started getting lot of attention after the ring image went viral. She has been designing this particular ring since last year, and the attention she is getting now is completely unexpected. Right after the ring went viral she admits that 90 percent of her orders are for this particular Snitch ring and she is very happy with the response. This is a classic example of how things in this world can be driven by internet and social media.

Maybe you have an idea or design in mind for a ring that you want. We would love to make it for you, and who knows, it could also go viral in this age of internet and social media. We are a full service store and can handle any level of complex designs when it comes to custom work so drop by our store with your ideas and see how we work with you to bring your dream idea to real world.

Double Diamond Sale Record

From Princie Diamond that sold for $39million in April, to the internally flawless, Golcondo Diamond, Two more rare diamonds have touched record breaking sale in Geneva, making 2013 a record-breaking year for diamond auctions globally.

Here are the most expensive diamonds sold at auction in 2013.

THE PINK STAR
$83.2 million

Pink-Star-Diamond

“Ladies and gentlemen, 68 million (Swiss francs) is the world record bid for a diamond ever bid and it’s right here,” Sotheby’s David Bennett said to applause as he brought down the hammer in the Geneva salesroom.
 
The Pink Star, previously known as “The Steinmetz Pink”, made a record $83 million dollars, including commission fees, $22 million more than expected. This internally flawless, oval cut natural fancy vivid pink diamond weighs 59.6 carats, was cut from a 132ct rough diamond that was unearthed 12 years ago (weighing 132 carats in its rough form)

THE ORANGE
$36million 

Orange-Diamond

 “It’s a world record price for an orange diamond, it’s a world record price per carat for any colored diamond,” the Christie’s auction house said of the sale.

This 14.82ct pear-shaped diamond broke two world records: the price per carat for any fancy color diamond at auction, and the price for a fancy-vivid orange diamond.

It was expected to fetch a mere $21million, but ended up selling for $36million at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels Sale in Geneva on 12 November 2013. The total sale price was boosted by another $4.04 million in taxes and commission.

The man who made the purchase swiftly got up and left the room to a round of applause. Christie’s did not reveal his identity.

Champagne-Colored ‘Kimberley Diamond’

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A rare 19th century 55-carat diamond, once part of the Russian Crown Jewels has gone on temporary view at New York’s American Museum of Natural History on Central Park West. The Diamond gets its name from the Kimberley mine in South Africa where it was found before 1868. It has also been described as a “cape diamond,” an Old World term meaning “deep color.”

kimberleydiamond1

The Kimberley Diamond went through a number of transformations during its 145-year history. It was cut from a 490-carat crystal into a 70-carat gem in 1921. The original diamond was fairly large, but there aren’t many descriptions of it, so its history isn’t well-known.

kimberleydiamond2

To improve its brilliance and proportions, the diamond was re-cut to its present form in 1958 by renowned New York City Fifth Avenue jewelers the Baumgold Bros. The rectangular diamond is about 1.25 inches in length and virtually flawless.by renowned New York City Fifth Avenue jewelers the Baumgold Bros. – See more at:-http://www.peleddiamonds.com/blog/dazzling-colored-diamond-on-display-in-nyc/#sthash.i7xYx6zL.dpuf
The diamond was then sold to Bruce F. Stuart, great-grandson of Carnation Company founder Elbridge Amos Stuart, in 1971. Over the years, the precious diamond was transferred to the Bruce F. Stuart Trust, which still owns it. The stone is on loan from the Bruce F. Stuart Trust, said exhibit curator George Harlow.